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5 Tips for Better Social Writing

Social Sonar - Thursday, January 16, 2014

Some people are lucky: the prose just seems to pour out of them. For the rest of us, it takes a special kind of effort to develop great writing that provides value for customers, represents our brands, and engages fans. Are you doing everything you can to create the best written content for your social strategy? Here are five tips to help you get there.

The Hardest Part is Getting Started

There’s no way around it. The most difficult part of writing is getting started. Clearing away distractions, getting your thoughts organized and setting out to churn out great content is by far the hardest part of any kind of writing. By following a publishing schedule, you can establish a helpful routine that lets you stay on task. Setting deadlines is also important, especially if you’re working on your own, without an editor. You might consider setting up reminders on a program like Google Calendar to help keep you accountable.

Write When You’re Not Writing

Just because you’re not sitting at your desktop computer or laptop doesn’t mean you can’t be writing. In fact, you might be doing yourself a great disservice by insisting that the only time to “really write” is when you’re sitting at your desk with a blank page before you. No matter how many tabs you have open in your browser, inspiration may be hard to come by if you’re not engaging with the real world. Take a small pen and pad of paper everywhere you go and jot down ideas as they come to you. Wait until your brain is teeming with ideas and then sit down to work. You’ll find that writing is much more enjoyable when the ideas seem to pour out on their own.

Edit, Edit, Edit. But Write First!

You don’t have to edit as you write. Your inner editor may want to jump the gun, but it's best to get your ideas out while they’re still fresh. Editing as you write might curb some of your better instincts. Trust that you’re on your way to creating something great and go for it! Then, take a break, step back, and return to your writing when you’ve had some time to “cleanse your palate.” Your own writing might seem foreign to you, which is a good thing--you’ll be able to judge it in a much more objective way.

Keep it Pithy

Longform content aside, social media is a place to keep things concise. Facebook posts may allow you more room to expound on your ideas, but that doesn’t always mean you should take advantage of this feature. Fans that are scrolling through their newsfeeds are more likely to ignore you if you start gaining a reputation for being too verbose. Keep it punchy, pithy and include a call to action to generate the most engagement.

Kill Your Darlings

If you’ve ever taken a writing or composition class, you’ve no doubt come across this gem: “Kill your darlings.” This perennial piece of advice has been attributed to so many authors that its true origin might be impossible to pinpoint. Apocryphal status aside, the idea behind this old adage still rings true: if your idea stinks, just let it go. If you’re working on a piece of writing like a blog and find you can’t resolve its disparate pieces into something to be proud of, ditch it. Take it as a sign that something better is waiting to bubble up.

How do you handle the parts of your social marketing strategy that involve writing? Share your best advice in the comments section below.