Up Periscope

Tweet Chats: Take a Two-Pronged Approach

Social Sonar - Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Part of Twitter’s beauty is the way it forces users to be concise. Many interactions on Twitter consist of “one-offs,” retweets, short replies and, on occasion, longer back-and-forth exchanges that can last a few days. While this enables quickfire connections and dynamic newsfeeds, the brevity of this kind of communication can also leave you wanting more. That’s where Tweet Chats come in.

Tweet Chats lets you structure your Twitter activity around one specific topic for as long as you want. Whether you are looking to host one or just participate, the logistics are simple. Just set a time and create a hashtag that helps followers label their contributions to the conversation. Everyone who’s taking part can track new contributions by following the hashtag. Sound interesting? Take a two-pronged approach to make the best of Tweet Chats:

Reach out to Customers

If you have an active Twitter community that follows your business, you can host a Tweet Chat to connect with customers. If you’re on the cusp of a big announcement, treat it is a mini-press conference. You can facilitate the chat by asking customers questions or turn the tables and let them drive the conversation. When curious newcomers join your Tweet Chat, you have the chance to engage them and turn them into brand devotees.

Network with other Professionals

Looking to connect with other industry influencers? Look for Tweet Chats they may be hosting. Other people in your field might already be meeting to discuss new trends that could impact you. There’s even the possibility for strategizing to form important partnerships along the way.

What’s your area of expertise? Is there a pressing issue in your industry that you’re curious about? What are your customers' most frequent questions? Use this directory of regular chats and start Tweet Chatting your way to some answers!



Social Sonar's Mixer at Twirly Girls!

Social Sonar - Monday, September 19, 2011
Social Sonar recently held a mixer for local business owners to discuss how social media affects them.  Twirly Girls hosted the event and we had ten business owners (and a few friends) in attendance.  The feeling in the room seemed to be somewhat uniform: With the hard times brought on by this economy, being creative and building your own business has become the only way some families can put food on their table.  We were very excited to see such innovative entrepreneurs at the mixer.

Among our attendees, we had Bel, the owner of the dance studio Twirly Girls, who has been successfully running her business for over two years.  She uses Facebook, Twitter and Meetup to keep people up-to-date on the studio's events.  Doug joined us and he owns DK Designs.  He creates the t-shirts sold at Twirly Girls.  He is not yet using social media for his business.  We also had Jenna's Jams.  Jenna jars and sells her own jams and pickles.  She manages a fan page on Facebook.  Andrew from Liquidpulp Photography, who does most of the photography for Twirly Girls, was also in attendance.  He uses Facebook and Twitter to publicize his deals.  Shelly from Shelly's Pole Studio was there and also very kindly performed a demonstration for our audience.  She also uses Facebook and Twitter for her business.  

Besides discussing the benefits to using social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook, a hot topic was whether using deal websites such as Groupon or Living Social was beneficial to small businesses.  Although the sites are certainly continuing to find companies with deals to offer, it seems like many business owners are wary of the price cut they have to make in order to have access to any deal site's customer list. On one hand, offering a deal may expose your business to a whole new set of customers.  On the other hand, you are being paid a fraction of what you would normally make and there are no guarantees that any of those customers will return.

We also touched on the topic of professionals, such as doctors and attorneys, using social media.  As it gains popularity, having some kind of presence on social media websites is becoming almost mandatory.  We discussed some of our success stories, and how you can build followers on Twitter or fans on Facebook. 

The members of Social Sonar really enjoyed interacting with our attendees.  Each of us have a different area of expertise, so we were able to bring a fairly vast amount of experience to the event.  We felt that these owners already understood the importance of incorporating social media into their marketing plan -- some just needed some advice on how to implement it.  Personal interactions with your customers through social media sites can make a significant difference to a customer who might be on the fence about using your service or buying your product.  

We at Social Sonar really feel like owning your own business is the American dream and we feel very fortunate to have shared our time with this group of local business owners.  If you are interested in hosting a Social Sonar mixer with other business owners in your area, please let us know.